AI Weirdness: the strange side of machine learning

Tag: ucsd

Total 119 Posts

(Untitled)

ucresearch: How Dust Is Holding Science BackTo most of us dust is just something we clean off our furniture, but to scientists dust can cause big problems in the lab. Computer chips are put together and tested in what are called clean rooms. These environments use filters to limit the
(Untitled)

(Untitled)

This seemed like a good day to post some rainbow laser modes! Light in a circular cavity makes a variety of standing wave patterns, some of which look like flowers, wagon wheels, or even tie-fighter spaceships. These images are from my simulations of the light in the cavities of nanolasers
(Untitled)

(Untitled)

Top: An electron microscope photo of long, straight waveguides (left) interrupted by an accidental scratch during fabrication, that turned the orderly stripes into naturalistic chaos. Each structure is about 0.5 microns high, or less than 1/200 the thickness of a typical human hair. Bottom: A photo on quite
(Untitled)

(Untitled)

This is the nanolaser equivalent of being smacked in the face with a slab of corrugated roofing during a tornado.  There’s one step in making microscopic lasers where you have to peel away metal from much of the substrate, leaving behind pillar-shaped lasers surrounded by small metallic patches.  These
(Untitled)

(Untitled)

On the right: a photonic nanostructure, used in researching new light-based ways to make computers communicate faster. On the left: a single human hair (oops). Fortunately, according to Dr. Felipe Vallini of UCSD (who made and imaged this structure): “A hair hit my device, but he is still fine!”
(Untitled)

(Untitled)

This fractal pattern is actually a guide to shaping laser pulses. Each pixel in this image represents one possible laser pulse shape (the arrival time of the frequencies in a broadband laser pulse).  The pixel’s color indicates how good that particular pulse shape should be at controlling a particular
(Untitled)

(Untitled)

Nano Street Fight Electron microscope image submitted by grad student Rajat Sharma of UCSD, who looked unsuccessfully with another grad student for a Brad Pitt-esque central character, before giving up and declaring the fight a total mess.  They were testing the etching conditions for making a series of tiny uniform
(Untitled)

(Untitled)

Nanolasers with googly eyes!  Because grad students. These are microscopic lasers, shown in various stages of completion. The innermost layer, looking like a slim grey column, is the semiconductor core, which actually does the light-amplifying.  Next comes a layer of glass that coats the entire laser (the white puffy-looking laser)
(Untitled)

(Untitled)

A nano-lollipop?  This is a tiny glass ball on a tiny stick made of polymer, a partially-completed nano-sized chemical sensor made by then-grad-student Matthew Chen.  It’s on its way to becoming a nano-torch, which can detect minute concentrations of chemicals due to its ability to focus light. This whole
You've successfully subscribed to AI Weirdness
Great! Next, complete checkout for full access to AI Weirdness
Welcome back! You've successfully signed in.
Unable to sign you in. Please try again.
Success! Your account is fully activated, you now have access to all content.
Error! Stripe checkout failed.
Success! Your billing info is updated.
Error! Billing info update failed.