AI Weirdness: the strange side of machine learning

Tag: rainbow

Total 18 Posts
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This seemed like a good day to post some rainbow laser modes! Light in a circular cavity makes a variety of standing wave patterns, some of which look like flowers, wagon wheels, or even tie-fighter spaceships. These images are from my simulations of the light in the cavities of nanolasers
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This fractal pattern is actually a guide to shaping laser pulses. Each pixel in this image represents one possible laser pulse shape (the arrival time of the frequencies in a broadband laser pulse).  The pixel’s color indicates how good that particular pulse shape should be at controlling a particular
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Pretty rainbow colors brought to you by the wave nature of light. The phenomenon that made these wild colors out of a thin film of photoresist on silicon is the same phenomenon that’s behind the rainbow colors of soap bubbles and oily puddles. It’s also a more chaotic
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A strange landscape with an even stranger sky. This is a microscope view of the edge of a smooth chunk of silicon, coated with a thin clear plasticy layer of photoresist.  Just like the colors in a soap bubble, this colorless thin layer produces rainbow colors due to the wave
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The color makeup of a fluorescent light, imaged through a spectrometer made of folded paper and a chunk of DVD.  You can print and fold your own for free following the instructions here (they also have a kit, which is what I used). The DVD chunk does all the work,
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Light in a circular cavity makes a variety of standing wave patterns, some of which look like flowers, wagon wheels, or even tie-fighter spaceships. These images are from my simulations of the light in the cavities of nanolasers - each pattern is called a mode, and the smaller the laser,
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This is what an ordinary coffee shop looks like through diffraction glasses, which act like prisms to separate white light into a rainbow of colors.  In this shot, you can see that not all white sources are alike - a few of them produce a continuous rainbow of colors, while
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Like little colorful jewels, these microscopic spots of color are probably the remnants of a thin coating that once covered this sample.  The spots get their color not from the usual pigments or dyes that color things like flower petals and paint, but from another phenomenon, called structural color, which
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There aren’t any dyes or pigments in this photo - all this color is due to the wave nature of light.  Thin transparent films produce rainbows, when light waves bouncing off the top and the bottom of the film interfere with each other on the way back.   It’s
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Thin transparent films produce rainbows - an effect due to the wave nature of light (the same effect that gives soap bubbles their rainbow colors).  Here, the thin film might be photoresist or dried residue from some sort of solvent, like acetone.  I’ll probably never know, since this wasn’
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